go on the way you mean to continue

2016-07-17 14.28.01

When it’s me vs. jet-lag, jet-lag seams to win. I don’t just mean the confusion about whether I should be asleep or awake at any given moment of the day either. It has to do with catching up with where in the world I am and what in the world I am supposed to be doing. Landing back in Dublin after travelling, speaking and catching up with people around BC and Alberta (Canada) for a couple of months left me feeling like I had just been on one of those spinning rides at the amusements that tosses you around just a little too much … Which way is up? Am I standing or am I falling? How do my legs work? What’s my name again?

My losing streak with jet-lag began in December 2013 when I boomeranged around the globe in a month, first to New Zealand for a wedding and then to Canada for Christmas. Gone are the days of perfect sleep patterns as soon as I land and an obscure ability to adjust back into normal life within 24 hours. In its place is this tilting feeling of being totally off balance.

One thing was different this time though. From the moment I stepped into my home I had one line on repeat in my mind:

“Go on the way you mean to continue.”

It’s hard to believe that one line can make so much difference but it has. It is a breath and a pause – How do I want to continue? What patterns do I want to develop? It is motivation and opportunity to change directions. A two month interruption, even if it is a very welcome one, is enough time to mess with all the normal rhythms of life: sleeping and eating, exercise and work, creativity and connection.

“Go on the way you mean to continue.”

It offers a moment of acknowledging the current reality and making a decision of which direction to head. It allows for problem-solving the mundane situations with the resources available right here and now.

Go on the way you mean to continue … in how you think, in what you say to people, in how you connect with friends, in how you plan your meals, in the space you give creativity, in how you interact with God, in how you do your work, in how you live in your home … go on the way you mean to continue.